Red Sonja moves through the decades in a series of one-shots

Red Sonja finds herself deep in the culture of the 1980s in a special one-shot this June by acclaimed scribe Amy Chu.

40 years ago, Red Sonja once found herself mysteriously transported to the then-present, tangling with one red and blue wall-crawler and her immortal enemy Kulan Gath. Writer Amy Chu’s beloved ongoing run on Red Sonja kicked off in 2016 with a similar premise, taking the fiery-haired heroine to the constantly-under-construction bustling NYC of today. She also found herself out of time in Amy’s fun-filled crossover with Riverdale’s finest, Betty and Veronica. In this new special story, Sonja finds herself once again in more modern times in the City of Angels. Red Sonja goes to Hollywood!

“1982 was a special year. I mean it was the year of E.T., TRON, Magnum PI, Hill Street Blues. MTV was brand new and exciting. The Commodore 64 and Apple II ruled. There was no internet,” said writer Amy Chu. “If you thought my last run was wild, well… I love the fact that [artist] Eric didn’t blink an eye when I explained what was going on. It does get pretty crazy, but there’s a method behind the madness. I hope you have as much fun reading it as I had writing it.”

Vampirella returns to the (in)famous ’90s in a meta tale from acclaimed writer Max Bemis (Moon Knight, Savage) that delves into the celebrated and critiqued comics of the era as well as fandom itself!
The 1990s were one of the most exciting yet controversial eras in comic books. A time of bravado, excess, pouches, and cyborg assassins. But also heady and at times pretentious fantasy books usually written by Englishmen. As a reader at the time, Max Bemis was drawn to both types of books at the historic Golden Apple Comics in Los Angeles. Including his discovery of Vampirella, who somehow straddled the middle with explosive action stories, bad girl covers, and top tier creators like Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, and others.

Vampirella 1992 is a one-shot special that interweaves and melds those two styles, through the artistic stylings of Roberto Castro (Turok) and Marcos Ramos. For the covers, Castro is joined by fan-favorite Mike Krome and a cosplay variant.

“Vampirella 1992 explores these two sides of 90’s comic fandom, goofy and extreme versus heady, trippy and dark,” said writer Max Bemis. “It’s just as scary as imagining Alan Moore slow-dancing sexily with Rob Liefeld.”

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